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  General Sessions



OPENING GENERAL SESSION

Monday, June 8, 2015
7:30 am – 9:00 am

How to Make Your Efforts Count: Feeling Good vs. Doing Good
Bjørn Lomborg is a celebrated professor, statistician, and author of Cool It.  Named one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World by Time Magazine, Lomborg energizes participants with a controversial and stimulating session on how to prioritize the world's greatest problems—global warming, world poverty, disease—based on how effective our solutions might be. It's a thought-provoking and provocative list. The premise is that we can't solve every problem in the world, so we must ask:  Which ones should we fix first?

Sponsored by


GENERAL SESSION

Tuesday, June 9, 2015
7:30 am – 9:00 am

Positive Intelligence
Shirzad Chamine will show attendees how his research on positive intelligence can help them achieve their full potential for professional success and personal fulfillment. Chamine is Chairman of CTI, the largest coach training organization in world, author of the New York Times bestseller Positive Intelligence. Chamine has coached hundreds of CEO’s and executive teams as well as the faculty at Stanford and Yale business schools.

Sponsored by


LUNCHEON SESSION

Wednesday, June 10, 2015
12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Leadership Isn't For Cowards
Mike Staver will offer straightforward steps to leading courageously and practical tips for driving performance. Courageous leadership means toughening your approach by being rigorous in the application of your values through the company culture. It means confronting and challenging people, and not letting them get away with being less than you know they can be.

Sponsored by

*Additional fee and/or pre-registration required.


CLOSING GENERAL SESSION

Wednesday, June 10, 2015
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Success, fulfillment, and the Power of Being an Invisible
David Zweig is the author of Invisibles: The Power of Anonymous Work in an Age of Relentless Self-Promotion. In an age where gaining attention seems to be valued above all else what kind of person chooses to work behind the scenes . . . and thrives there? We too often measure our worth by the amount of praise we receive and, online, where we spend so much of our time today, by the number of "likes" and followers we have. But what if the supposed purpose of seeking all this attention is a vast myth?